ThreeObese

Obesity rates are still going up, up, up! A new report looks at obesity per state and finds the number of obese adults has increased in 23 states and did not go down in any states in the past year. In other words, we are fatter now than we were a year ago.

The report – F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies Are Failing in America 2009 – comes from the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. It shows Mississippi has the highest rate of adult obesity at 32.5 percent – the fifth year in a row the state has topped the list. Colorado has the lowest rate of obese adults – 18.9 percent.

F as in Fat: Quick Stats

  • Two-thirds of American adults are either obese or overweight.
  • In 1991, no state had an obesity rate above 20 percent.
  • In 1980, the national average for adult obesity was 15 percent.

State-by-State: Adult Obesity
1. Mississippi (32.5%)
2. Alabama (31.2%)
3. West Virginia (31.1%)
4. Tennessee (30.2%)
5. South Carolina (29.7%)
6. Oklahoma (29.5%)
7. Kentucky (29.0%)
8. Louisiana (28.9%)
9. Michigan (28.8%)
10. (tie) Arkansas (28.6%) and Ohio (28.6%)
12. North Carolina (28.3%) 13. Missouri (28.1%)
14. (tie) Georgia (27.9%) and Texas (27.9%)
16. Indiana (27.4%) 17. Delaware (27.3%)
18. (tie) Alaska (27.2%) and Kansas (27.2%)
20. (tie) Nebraska (26.9%) and South Dakota (26.9%)
22. (tie) Iowa (26.7%) and North Dakota (26.7%) and Pennsylvania (26.7%)
25. (tie) Maryland (26.0%) and Wisconsin (26.0%)
27. Illinois (25.9%)
28. (tie) Oregon (25.4%) and Virginia (25.4%) and Washington (25.4%)
31. Minnesota (25.3%)
32. Nevada (25.1)
33. (tie) Arizona (24.8%) and Idaho (24.8%)
35. Maine (24.7%)
36. New Mexico (24.6%)
37. New York (24.5%)
38. Wyoming (24.3%)
39. (tie) Florida (24.1%) and New Hampshire (24.1%)
41. California (23.6%)
42. New Jersey (23.4%)
43. Montana (22.7%)
44. Utah (22.5%)
45. District of Columbia (22.3%)
46. Vermont (22.1%)
47. Hawaii (21.8%)
48. Rhode Island (21.7%)
49. Connecticut (21.3%)
50. Massachusetts (21.2%)
51. Colorado (18.9%)

Our Nation’s Children

  • The percentage of obese or overweight children is at or above 30 percent in 30 states.
  • Mississippi also had the highest rate of obese and overweight children (ages 10 to 17) at 44.4 percent.
  • Minnesota and Utah had the lowest rate at 23.1 percent.
  • Eight of the 10 states with the highest rates of obese and overweight children are in the South.
  • Childhood obesity rates have more than tripled since 1980.

State-by-State: Obese and Overweight Children Ages 10-17
1. Mississippi (44.4%)
2. Arkansas (37.5%)
3. Georgia (37.3%)
4. Kentucky (37.1%)
5. Tennessee (36.5%)
6. Alabama (36.1%)
7. Louisiana (35.9%)
8. West Virginia (35.5%)
9. District of Columbia (35.4%)
10. Illinois (34.9%)
11. Nevada (34.2%)
12. Alaska (33.9%)
13. South Carolina (33.7%)
14. North Carolina (33.5%)
15. Ohio (33.3%)
16. Delaware (33.2%)
17. Florida (33.1%)
18. New York (32.9%)
19. New Mexico (32.7%)
20. Texas (32.2%)
21. Nebraska (31.5%)
22. Kansas (31.1%)
23. (tie) Missouri (31.0%) and New Jersey (31.0%) and Virginia (31.0%)
26. (tie) Arizona (30.6%) and Michigan (30.6%)
28. California (30.5%)
29. Rhode Island (30.1%)
30. Massachusetts (30.0%)
31. Indiana (29.9%)
32. Pennsylvania (29.7%)
33. (tie) Oklahoma (29.5%) and Washington (29.5%)
35. New Hampshire (29.4%)
36. Maryland (28.8%)
37. Hawaii (28.5%)
38. South Dakota (28.4%)
39. Maine (28.2%)
40. Wisconsin (27.9%)
41. Idaho (27.5%)
42. Colorado (27.2%)
43. Vermont (26.7%)
44. Iowa (26.5%)
45. (tie) Connecticut (25.7%) and North Dakota (25.7%) and Wyoming (25.7%)
48. Montana (25.6%)
49. Oregon (24.3%)
50. (tie) Minnesota (23.1%) and Utah (23.1%)

The report says the tough economy could make the obesity epidemic even worse. Food prices, especially for more nutritious foods, are expected to go up, making it harder for families to eat a healthy diet. Plus rates of depression, anxiety, and stress – which are linked to obesity for many people – are also increasing because of the strain of the recession.

You can see the full report here.
Compare it to last year’s report here.

[Photo Credit: stockxpert]